Owling in Páramo

Now that we’re into April, this breeding season’s owling is well into its swing. Owling is the name our group gives to the activity of putting up nest boxes and monitoring them for these magnificent birds. In the UK, Barn Owls, Little Owls and Tawny Owls breed inside pre-existing cavities, such as tree hollows and outbuildings, but all will breed in nest boxes. Short-eared Owls are ground nesters and Long-eared Owls prefer to breed in old Magpie and Crow nests.

I started owling in 2006 and have been hooked ever since. Continue reading

Páramo confirmed 2017 Official Kit Partner for British Exploring

Páramo is supporting British Exploring during their 2017 expeditionary year as official kit partner. British Exploring CEO Honor Wilson-Fletcher commented: ”British Exploring is working to raise awareness of environmental issues through our programmes, and to ensure that we leave no trace behind us when we visit wild, remote and fragile environments. It’s a particular pleasure for us to work with an organisation whose brand is about both technical excellence, always a priority, and ethical manufacturing.”

British Exploring will stage 7 expedition programmes in 2017 for young people, visiting the Amazon, Himalayas, Yukon, Spanish Badlands and Iceland – as part of their work as a Youth Development Charity.

Simon White, Chief Leader Expeditionary Year Iceland 2017 gives his perspective on the work of British Exploring and the Páramo partnership… Continue reading

Why underlayer when you can overlayer with Torres?

The Páramo Overlayering System with the new Torres Jackets

Páramo Overlayering: Torres Jackets

You’re probably familiar with the situation: you’re on the steepest climb on the way to the summit, and there just isn’t a good spot to stop and put on a warm layer under your shell, but the higher you get, the colder and windier conditions become.

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The Little Owl in Britain

Little Owls are amazing birds. They’re only eight inches tall, yet they ooze so much personality. Their quirky behaviours are utterly charming and a sheer joy to watch. Many people are surprised to learn that this much loved owl is not native. Landowners successfully introduced the Little Owl into England during the 1880s; these were brought over from mainland Europe to control ‘garden pests’. After its initial and rapid spread across England and Wales, the Little Owl started to decline from the late 1930s. More recently, this decline has accelerated, with numbers down by 64% in 25 years.

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