Happy 30th Birthday to us!

Since April 1992, when Nick Brown formed a partnership with Creaciones Miquelina in Bogotá, Colombia, Páramo has protected people outdoors with high performance, sustainable and award-winning clothing.

Celebrating 30 years
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Páramo becomes an Employee Owned Trust

For 30 years, Páramo has engineered waterproofs that do not become obsolete – our garments are easily repaired and their waterproofing can be indefinitely renewed. To ensure the promise of durability and recyclability for Páramo People in the future, Nick Brown has sold Páramo Directional Clothing to the people that know it best – its employees.

Nick Brown wearing an early Páramo smock
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Páramo and the Miquelina Foundation

Páramo and the Miquelina Foundation have grown together over 30 years, providing employment and training for over 10,000 women. In February 2022, Páramo integrated the management of the Miquelina factory into its business, ensuring the continuation of our production partnership in to the future…

Alicia Gomez, Miquelina seamstress
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Running in the Lincolnshire Wolds

Hiya, I’m Steve. I work for a national homelessness charity supporting those who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness and help them into secure and sustainable tenancies. I work across South Yorkshire but live in the Lincolnshire Wolds having moved down here from Scotland about 20 years ago now (as I write that I realise that soon I’ll have lived in England longer than I lived in Scotland!). I’m still a Scot though, right? Freckles, ginger beard…(Aye, I am).

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Páramo helps Jim Clark stay warm and dry whilst policing the Peak District and Cheshire hills…

My name is Jim Clark, I am forty-eight years young and a father of three primary school aged children. I am a police officer and have been for eighteen years. Having spent twelve of that in the capital city I made my way up north six years ago. I am now based on a Police Rural Crime team in the North West of the UK...

On my rest days I love to explore the fabulous Peak District and the rolling countryside of Cheshire. Often after dropping the children off at school I will head straight to the hills to unwind and take my mental and physical exercise whatever the weather.

My job is quite demanding and as a team we cover a vast area looking after our rural communities and businesses. I never take for granted the role I am in; I am so lucky to be out and about in the countryside meeting some amazing people in all weather conditions. I have total admiration for our UK famers who constantly toil to help put food on our tables. I love spending my days with them, their families, rural businesses and rural workers whilst also showing a visible presence to deter criminality.

Our UK countryside is stunning, and we do our best to deter, prevent and detect travelling criminality who try taking advantage of rural locations and the honest way of farming life.

Policing the hills

Criminals rarely bother about the weather and often use the cover of inclement weather and darkness to commit crime, which means we can often work long protracted shifts in all weathers out on foot with very little opportunity or time for a change of clothes or to warm up in the comfort of an office. Good quality clothing is essential in keeping us alert and able to operate in all weathers for the duration of our shifts.

Having spent some considerable time in the British Army prior to my current role I am well aware of how the quality of uniform clothing can impact our ability to carry out our roles in all weathers. It quickly becomes apparent how much money members of the armed forces and, also, police officers, spend on good quality “civilian” biased outdoor clothing.

The snowy Peak District

From the mid-eighties when British Soldiers were purchasing their own Norwegian army jumpers to keep them warm on winter exercises to the modern-day (in my case, police officers), we can be thankful for the advancement of technical materials and manufacturing techniques in a new era of super effective clothing.

With this in mind it’s not uncommon to see more frequently the “introduction” of good quality non police issue clothing being worn by officers, especially those who work in more rural locations. Clearly, we must be identifiable as police officers (most of the time) when operationally required, however, with a handy bit of army-taught needle and thread work the addition of a name badge or identifiable insignia isn’t too hard to add to a far superior garment. This adaption gives us the appearance that the public expect, but for the wearer the confidence that our clothing will offer us greater protection against the weather; longevity; and far more comfort that the more often cheaper, less technically adept mass-produced, contract-goes-to-the-cheapest-bidder issued clothing.

It is quite often the case on dark winter evenings when the weather is fit for ducks and sometimes penguins that my entire “uniform” is made up of a Parameta Technical long-sleeved shirt, (super toasty) and a Torres Medio Gilet to keep me snug under my Alturo jacket. For those moments when I want to blend into the landscape my Halcon jacket comes out to protect me from the elements and the unwanted prying eye.

When I am not at work and out in the hills my choice is once again my long-sleeved shirt and my Halcon, or, for when it gets slightly warmer, my outer layer smock and, to keep the grey matter warm, my awesome Paramo beanie hat.

The brilliant Nikwax materials and washing solutions keep everything working as it should and I will often use these aftercare products to add some protection to my standard issue clothing to try and enhance its not-so-protective capabilities!

I love the ethical manufacturing partnership that Páramo has and whilst out on patrol targeting organised criminality it is reassuring to know the protection I am offered by the clothing has come full circle via Paramo’s employment of vulnerable women in Bogota, Colombia. In a probably more than tenuous link between the criminals we are targeting it feels we are inextricably linked to these ladies by Páramo.

The amazing Páramo recycling scheme, just like the clothing, gives me a warm glowing feeling. The fact that when – and I’m not holding my breath – I ever need to replace my garments I can return them to Páramo, and in one way, shape or form they will end up being recycled. Of course, the generous discount they offer on new products is a bonus but that, for me, is second to the far superior products that Páramo produce. I will always make Páramo my first choice of outdoor clothing both “off” and sometimes more discreetly “on” duty.

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Our buddie Freddie, by Jenny Olivant

Jenny and her husband Mike have both enjoyed long careers in the RAF, are fortunate enough to be able to take advantage of a variety of outdoor pursuits, and have grown to appreciate the absolute benefit of using good quality kit appropriate to the environment and conditions. The weather never holds them back and after many years they have found Páramo, above all other brands, enables them to get out in all conditions and remain warm, comfortable and dry...

Jenny, Mike and Freddie the Beagle

A dog has always been part of our married life and part of the reason for our many outdoor adventures.
We welcomed our most recent addition, coincidentally, at the start of lockdown last year.

Let me introduce Freddie, our Beagle. After doing our research we decided a Beagle would be the ideal breed for us – compact, (fits in the Campervan perfectly) energetic, intelligent and full of love.
Born on the 27th March 2020, we brought him home on 22nd May and so our new Canine adventures began.

Freddie in the Shropshire Hills

Young Freddie has helped keep us sane, entertained, positive and active throughout the past year and half. The long warm summer of enforced lockdown turned out to be the best possible time to get to know our Freddie. Having to stay home gave us the time to spend with him, to bond and prepare him for his life ahead. Training him was fun too, Freddie loves a challenge. We soon learnt that you have to be persistent and consistent with a Beagle.

At 12 weeks old it was time to introduce Freddie to the greater outdoors. And so, the wonders of his outdoor adventures began. The local park was his first experience of a wide-open space and where he met his first furry pals. Very quickly he was tearing around the park, rough and tumbling with his buddies.

Freddie and his friends

Living amongst the Shropshire Hills, an AONB, we couldn’t wait to take Freddie out and about and show him the sights. We had to build up his walkies time slowly, but a priority was to practice his recall and let him off his lead whenever we could. We started his walks in the nearby woodlands and progressed on to local landmarks such as the Long Mynd and the Stiperstones.

Freddie at Blea Tarn

In between Lockdowns, Freddie was introduced to “Van adventures”. He adapted brilliantly to van life and as soon as we could, we were on the road to Wales, the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District for a few days here and there. It was such a rewarding experience for us to show Freddie our favourite places and give him a taste for the outdoor life we wanted to share with him.

Freddie’s first longish walk was around Blea Tarn where the wonderful cloud layers and still conditions created a great moody photo opportunity.

As the weather turned more inclement, we donned our Páramo jackets and continued our walk. The comfortable, roomy fit, and good-sized pockets make it the ideal jacket for all our dog walks together, whether short strolls in the park or longer walks across beautiful countryside.

Beautiful autumn

In October we decided to take Freddie on a longer adventure, and we packed up the Van for a three week trip up to Scotland.

Amazing autumnal colours greeted us as we toured around the beautiful Isles of Mull and Skye, the stunning sands of Arisaig, dramatic Glencoe and barren Rannoch Moor.

Due to his young age we were not able to show Freddie the mountain views, so instead we explored the lower hill paths and beaches. Every time the Van door slid open, he jumped out into a whole new world with fresh sights and smells. We even met some Scottish Beagle friends. Freddie loved every minute, taking it all in his stride. Even the wind and rain didn’t put him off and the long cut of our Páramo jackets kept us well protected from the elements. They also kept us nice and warm whilst photographing the stars above the Old Man of Storr one night. Not a soul around, just the eerie calls of the local Stags.

With our Scottish Adventures complete for now, another Lockdown confined the Van to sit once more idle on the drive. With a stay local rule we were fortunate to have the opportunity to enjoy some local snowy walks in the beautiful Shropshire countryside. Chilly winds and icy temperatures were kept at bay with our Páramo jackets and woolly hats whilst Freddie relied on bombing around in the snow to keep warm.

Snowy Shropshire

Every day we gaze at the Shropshire Hills and the distant Welsh mountains, looking forward to the longer brighter days of next spring and summer. Not long to wait now until our next adventure together and the chance for Freddie to explore more of the wonders of outdoor life.

Freddie and Jenny

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Páramo in the squirrel woods

By early 2014, I had been monitoring and photographing red squirrels in West Cumbria for about 18 months. It rains in Cumbria (sometimes heavily) and I found that my existing waterproofs did not provide the required level of protection and comfort. April 2014 saw me in Scotland and the weather forecast, unseasonably warm, suggested that my trip, carrying heavy camera equipment, was likely to be a distinctly uncomfortable experience. I bought my first Páramo jacket, a Cascada, for the trip, was delighted with the results, and soon bought my first pair of Cascada directional trousers. My comfort level immediately improved.

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